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20131105
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thing where we spent a great deal of time is our educational system urge -- system. have more students country than any other in our educational system. why do they come here, it is not just the quality of education, but the type of education. i think some of the disadvantages of education globally, so many people are taught facts. this might work very well for i am notcores -- and trying to diminish that at all. i do believe the american style of learning should get more credit in the ability to be thoughtful and critical thinking. as an employer who this year we hired 1100 employees and the year before we hired 1100 overyees, i would tell you 80% of the employees come from u.s. universities. we will continue to have that. as an employer and some of you has offices and 38 countries, the bulk of our employees comes from the united states and we are looking for people who know how to think and think creatively. >> thank you, larry. let shift to bill. from allst retailer over the world -- trying to increase the sourcing you're doing here in the united states. could you give us perspectiv
security guard and that has the persona of safety. >> reporter: since 2002 the u.s. department of education under title 9 said institutions receiving federal funds must insure education free of sexual discrimination. many colleges and universities say they were unaware of their legal obligation to also protect students from sexual assaults. >> we absolutely put much more emphasis on preventing plagiarism then rape. that's reality. >> reporter: own annie graduated. in 2012 she and andrea found each other. they began to talk about the issue of rape at the university of north carolina. >> we said north carolina is not a bad place. we said its representation of a larger cultural problem. >> reporter: they began to research title 9, interviewing victims of rape and utilizing social media. in 2013 along with former unc administrator and two others they filed a federal complaint against the university of north carolina at the department of education. >> when you have 18- and 19-year-old men and women who are holding the government accountable for rape, like it just--it's boggles my mind. >> report
are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >> i'm candy crowley in washington with a check of headlines. new details about the shooting rampage at los angeles international airport. federal authorities say suspected gunman paul ciancia shot tsa officer gerardo hernandez multiple times at pointblank range, went up an escalator and then returned to shoot hernandez again. earlier on cnn's "state of the union," michael mccaul described what police found as a suicide note and said mental illness was a chief reason behind the shooting. the 23-year-old ciancia is currently hospitalized in police custody. he's charged with two felonies including the murder of a federal officer. terminal three at l.a.x. is open today. >>> secretary of state john kerry is in the middle east for meeting with u.s. allies. one of kerry's key missions is to smooth relations with saudi arabia which is upse
and in colorado voters will decide whether to raise state income taxes to boost education funding and also whether to tax recreational marijuana. joining us now to talk about these measures are megan verlee of colorado public radio and enrique cerna of kcts in seattle. welcome to you both. enrique cerna, let's talk about this again et ceteraically modified food initiative. this is about labeling, is that what it is? >> yes, it is. it is initiative 522. it would require the labeling of genetically modified foods on to products. what is interesting about this is that there's a lot of controversy over what is exempt and not exempt. and that's one of the things that the opponents of the initiative point out. and they say that they claim that it's a poorly written initiative. and that some items, some dairy products, some meat products, others would not be, would not apply to this. others would. so they think that this is going to add a lot of confusion. they also are against this because they feel that it is going to cost the consumer more money, whatever labeling that has to be done. would be sent do
innovation and education because of the nature of our communities and the structure and the openness with which they operate. that people will have access here because we will continue to work hard to make sure that we have the most qualified workers one of the largest consumer market in the world. this, i do not say any of with one bit of arrogance. good newsecause that for america is also good news for the world. it is good news for you and your businesses. nina the importance of the american economy in terms of driving china's economy and other economies in the world. their importance is driving other economies in the region and elsewhere. it is a principle reason why we should invest in here. it is a top priority at a level i might any before. -- unlike any before. you're sitting here in the hot -- heart of the most open economy in the world. the u.s. is the largest recipient of direct investment. manufacturing was mentioned. we have about 5.6 million total good paying american jobs contribute in close to when chilean dollars to our economy that comes from foreign direct investme
the excellence in u.s. higher education, how that helped us, training more and better engineers, but those days are ending. so our natural design advantages are going to be harder to come by going forward. and so we need those things, so we are not starting with a 10% cost disadvantage. >> in asia. what would it mean for caterpillar? >> we have a huge business in asia and growing. that is the single largest opportunity over the next decade or so. we intend to be that market. but again, i come back to the point that it is likely that a lot of those countries, a number of those, will do agreements with or without us. if we don't get tpp done. we will look into a market that we ought to be competing with. i'll move to africa because i am passionate about this. we watched the chinese really take over africa. they've come in with their own financing, their own engineering, sometimes their own workers to take over minerals, extraction, oil and gas, hydroelectric power across africa. i know, michael, that is on your agenda. but i am so pleased to hear that the crossover between commerce and the state,
a better education and if you can be more creative, you'll do better and if you don't, then unfortunately you're going to be struggling. >> what are you worried about when you look at new york after bloomberg? what are you worried about being undone or a legacy of government that will be perhaps eroded? >> i think most of the things we've done hopefully if we've done a good job will stay in place. yesterday i was in london. the weather was nice. you think better of any city when the sun is shining. but london is a real competitor to new york. and we've got to understand if we were to stop improving, stop diversifying, stop investing, we will get pushed back and other places will take over. i was in paris the day before. i had dinner with some people all of whom talked about their friends moving out of paris and out of france because tax rates are so high. those are people that will create jobs and pay taxes down the road. you can't hold the waves from coming in. you have to keep making society open and you have to keep providing opportunities. if you start to focus on equal results rather
. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. avo: sales event is "sback.hen drive" which means it's never been easier to get a new passat, awarded j.d. power's most appealing midsize car, two years in a row. and right now you can drive one home for practically just your signature. get zero due at signing, zero down, zero deposit, and zero first month's payment on any new 2014 volkswagen. hurry, this offer ends october 31st. for details, visit vwdealer.com today. ideolog ideologue >> time to take a look at the morning papers from our parade of papers. the raleigh observer a carnival rider is under arrest accused of tampering with the ride the vortex. five people were hurt at the ride. the operator face three felony counts for assault with a deadly weapon. the injuries happened when the vortex restarted as passengers were getting off the ride, knocking five people unconscious. three of them reportedl
from educated, trained personnel and the value of quality we are offering on the greek islands is in comparison with other nations. we must take things in our hands. so we are working harder. we are looking better for our products and we are trying to have good quality. that is very important. it seems like our efforts up to now, people are traveling to greece. >> i've spoken to a lot of italians and ask them how they step away from all of the austerity measures and the shenanigans of government and say focusing on business. they say you would never have a business if you listened to the politics. is it a major business increase? >> no, it is not. me as a businessman in tourism, i understand i have to fight and i have to fight for my world and my world is tourism. austerity doesn't help. now we are in the sixth year under austerity measures but somehow we all -- you know, economies go through cycle. we need more of a boost. tourism is giving us the moral boost we need as a nation and as a country. >> what are the problems of raising money in this market. how do you access more
's what i represent, in florida we are doing 3,000 education seminars from the beginning of september through the end of march, making sure that people understand what their options are. we're in all 67 counties, we built retail centers, we're reaching out to our customers so they understand what their choices are. and we believe people will find choices there that work. >> my question is, will people pay more? >> people who are subsidized are probably going to have the opportunity to pay less. it really is an individualized issue. and there may be some people who pay more, but it really depends on your individual circumstances. >> you met at the white house with senior aides going through this obama carroe rollout. as an insurance executive, you signed up basically for a deal here, which is to say, okay, we'll cover people who have preexisting conditions. we'll do that if you can deliver us some more business. give us younger, healthier people who probably aren't going to need our insurance, and that's how we'll make money and balance out the fact we're going to pay more out, coverin
exotic flute music] ♪ captioning and audio description provided by the u.s. department of education. >> bokara: i'm bokara legendre. join me and my guests--scholars and scientists, spiritual teachers and philosophers-- as we explore the boundaries of religion and metaphysics, of science and spirituality. join me and some really fascinating people as we try to figure out what life's all about and how it can have meaning for each one of us.
to cope with that. she was better educated most had grabher school education with the hitler youth for girls with secretarial trading work to help out on farms or restaurants or working class but of the other hand in ned got her law degree in the 30's which was pretty unusual. and she decided which she was called upon to do her patriotic duty that she played joy in the red cross that during the first world war had the organization that attracted upper-class women associates said i will go to the red cross. low and behold she did not have medical trading but was pulled out because they immediately noticed she was cultured and said we will set up the leadership the special soldiers' homes in the we are area of the occupied territory. this is from her personal album. soldiers go to a friend then returning can have stopovers with german cookies in to interact with nice german women to relax and recreates so there were 1200 german women like her sent to the east to manage the soldier holmes in she was said to to a town that had a population of about 9,000 jews. shortly before she went o
not there this improves educational outcomes. even the department of education's own study on headstart shows you a lot of these early investments don't pay off. >> let's turn to new jersey where you are a voter, james, and chris christie, the republican governor, looks like he's going to coast to re-election, but there's an interesting ballot initiative that would imbed, raise the minimum wage and imbed future minimum wage increases into the constitution. >> right, into the state constitution. it's knocking the state minimum wage about a point above, going to about 8.5%. $8.25 an hour. this is really when you look at young people and their struggle to find work in new jersey, this is about the last thing we need. our state has a higher unemployment rate than any of our neighbors. pennsylvania, new york, delaware. and it really is above the national average. so now you're taking that group of people that wants to come into the workforce, that wants skills, that wants to show they can do a job, and you're making it that much harder for small businesses to hire them. >> let's turn to virginia. which i be
dew point me to talk. i can go back to the south of france. >> i want you to educate what report suggests that george w. bush tapped the phones of world leaders? >> when did this start? >> four or five years ago. >> 2002. >> 2002. >> the tapping of foreign leaders. >> yes. so you have to apply the same questions to president bush, first of all, whether they do or do not know. i think barnacle brought up the biggest point and that is the nsa overreaching in its power, is this something people want done but they don't want to hear about it. you got to look at that part of it too because we can apply this to a couple of different issues that we complained about or argued about on our set about the conduct of the bush administration. but i would say that most importantly, the important disconnect that i think is happening in this story is that people are thinking that like someone is sitting there listening to her conversations. the phone calls are being monitored. that's different than tapping the phone. >> this is gene. i did write about it this morning. >> i was reading that. >> t
about education levels, income levels. it turns out the older you are, it seems you are more satisfied. respondents say that folks are more likely to ask them for advice and get more respect on the job. >> why are younger workers not as satisfied. >> it has to do with finding out who your in the workforce. the workforce has had a dramatic shift in the last two decades. according to figures, we see american changing jobs, not careers, but jobs around 10 times in a lifetime. that's significant. for millennials, it's more than that. >> sometimes out of necessity. >> it is a shocking statistic, one in five women will be sexually assaulted during their college years. colleges are increasingly coming under fire for failing to protect their students. america tonight is focusing on the problem in a special series called "sex crimes on campus." >> my head was slammed into a bathroom door and then again next to the toilet and the assault proceeded. >> i remember putting my hands on the sink and just looking at myself in the mirror, and not even being able to fully comprehend what had just happen
an education model to reverse the trend. >> chinook middle school applied for and received several grants, using the money for teacher training. test scores since then have gone up, using the same teachers and staff. >> one is providing expectation for the kids, that they can do it, putting a great teacher in front of the students, day in, day out. and looking at the time of the day, to make sure you maximise the time that the kids are learning and involving the parents to the greater degree in the education. >> experts say funding is an important part of the equation. >> raising standards is good, but oftentimes those problems come with an injection of resources. >> many schools receive the same amount of funding or less than a decade ago. the poverty report doesn't signal all doom and cloom. it means schools have to work smarter. >> it's stuff that is already happening to create successful kids in other schools, making it available for everyone. jennifer believes in that philosophy. >> one of my favourite quotes is it's going to be hard, but it will be worth it. i think if they leave he
among educated people. if you have much idea why europe exploded, though they may know that a big league with an extravagant mustache got shot. the most widely held belief is that the conflict was simply a guessing mistake for which all the european powers share blame, it's folly compounded by the british incompetence of military commanders. this is what i would characterize as the poets greuel, first articulated by the likes of robert graves amid the modern blood they felt that no cause could be worth the slaughter. today some brave people and maybe also saw americans feel almost embarrassed that we finished up on the witness -- winning side, yet my own opinion is somewhat different. while the war was assuredly a colossal tragedy, there was a cause a stake. certainly, britain could not possibly have remained neutral, while germany secured e-germany over the continent. a german victory in world war -- world war i will simply have created something like the european union half a century earlier. that we, the british, not to mention the united states could have remained unbloodied by stand
scared when i think about my daughter. i do not want her to marry. i want her to continue her education. my daughter has not been able to forget the beatings that i suffered for many years. >> reporter: she has been granted a divorce, and her terrible experience and determination to ban child marriages seems to have finally paid off. members of the organization drafting yemen's new constitution say that the charter would set the minimum age for marriage at 18. but some clerics and tribal leaders say they will block the motion of the country's transition to elections expected early next year. >> we don't have any problems related to child marriage. most of the cases are fabricated so foreign institutions impose on yemen. >> reporter: a we hadding i we e capitol. a relative of the bride pays tribute to her and her tribe. then a poet praising the groom. but weddings in yemen are not always this happy. >> this is a country where marrying off young girls to older men is a common practice. we may never know the exact number of the child brides because yemen is a conservative society. and anyo
the world. in both innovation and education because of the nature of our universities, the structure, the number, and the openness with which they operate. and i believe also people will have access here because we will continue to work hard to make sure that we have the most qualified workers and one of the largest consumer markets in the world. again, i say, i don't say any of this with one touch of arrogance. i say it because that's -- that goodness for america's also in fact good news for the world. and it's good news for you and your businesses. and you know the importance of the american economy in terms of driving china's economy and other economies in the world, and their imports now to driving other economies in their regions and elsewhere. and it's a principle reason why i believe you ought to invest here. is why president obama is making attracting job creating investment a top priority at a level unlike any before. so you are sitting here this morning, we believe, in the heart of the most open economy in the world hear the united states already is the world's largest reci
on a sweeping education overhall and are being asked to pass $1 billion tax increase to boost school funding and the idea is controversial and it's strict. raise per pupil spending hurt by falling revenues. president obama was on the campaign trial not for himself but a fellow democratic and terry is running for governor in virginia and he shared the stage saturday in arlington and he tried to link the opponent to the government shut down. >> we have seen an extreme faction of the republican party that is shown again and again and again that they are willing to hijack the entire party and the country and the economy and grant progress to an absolute halt if they don't get 100% of what they want. >> reporter: he is leading in the polls, there is a governor race in new jersey where they will decide to reelect chris christie. romney is slamming president obama over the affordable care act and on nbc he is unhappy with the similar law that romney signed when he was governor of massachusetts. >> in massachusetts we phased in the requirements so that there was a slow roll out, that way you could
, and believe it or not, they also are seeing a lot of educated college educated people. carol? >> rosa flores reporting live for us this morning. >>> still to come in "cnn newsroom," remember this, the last u.s. bat troops to leave iraq? today there are new calls from iraq for a return to the u.s. military. they need help. we'll tell you more, next. the secret is out. hydration is in. [ female announcer ] only aveeno daily moisturizing lotion has an active naturals oat formula that creates a moisture reserve so skin can replenish itself. aveeno® naturally beautiful results. aveeno® help the gulf when we made recover and learn the gulf, bp from what happened so we could be a better, safer energy company. i can tell you - safety is at the heart of everything we do. we've added cutting-edge technology, like a new deepwater well cap and a state-of-the-art monitoring center, where experts watch over all drilling activity twenty-four-seven. and we're sharing what we've learned, so we can all produce energy more safely. our commitment has never been stronger. they're not usually this thin, this li
every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. to roll out a perfectly flaky crust that's made from scratch. or mix vegetables with all white meat chicken and homemade gravy. but marie callender's does. just sit down and savor. marie callender's. it's time to savor. just sit down and savor. so if ydead battery,t tire, need a tow or lock your keys in the car, geico's emergency roadside assistance is there 24/7. oh dear, i got a flat tire. hmmm. uh... yeah, can you find a take where it's a bit more dramatic on that last line, yeah? yeah i got it right here. someone help me!!! i have a flat tire!!! well it's good... good for me. what do you think? geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. medicare open enrollment. of year again. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better cov
. >> ismat said he has no regrets and it was his duty to educate his people. the only way to resist and maintain his dignity. now he says he wants to make use of what he learned in prison and pass it on. >> through teaching hebrew i empower the children so it can understand the mentality of the israelis and gain self confidence. >> after 20 years inside he's come out to a divided palestinian leadership, ever growing israeli settlements and a disillusioned people. stephanie decker in an occupied west bank. >>> three decades after the fall of the kmir rouge, the former ruling party was responsible for one of the worst mass killings of the 20th century. florence louie reports now from nophonpen. >> she watched them die from disease and hunger. after soldiers forced them and millions of others to march to the country side in an attempt to create an agricultural utopia. >> they didn't kill us. they left us in the jungle to die. >> to this day, the memories haunt her. prayers offer her some comfort. but she says she's still unable to sleep and relies on antianxiety medicine. she could be
on a global crusade against it educates scan reports kerry's attacks have more than quadrupled since two thousand and one and the u s began its war on terror the number of attacks on the kelly's has reached a record high. the national consortium for the study of terrorism respoes to terrorism estimates last year alone there were more than eight thousand five hundred years the tax withholding why he killed more than fifteen thousand five hundred people across africa asia and the least. he walked face his incredible surge of violence this year they recorded six thousand civilian deaths here's how tears i want to take a new mop following the us invasion in two thousand and three. the iraqi prime minister is here in washington. he just said his nation is facing a cold war of genocide and that the revolutions in the region have made it works. the line how about you was created not tied in other organizations were able to expel ethan gain ground. will they benefit from the form of state structures. parents now flock to see maria for a safe haven. and for this area is from a deal between the op
to be from the american people were starting to get educated about this issue and starting to organize and protest here we demand others live up to the standard of accountability that we don't hold up to ourselves terrorism is still the main argument american politicians use to justify spy programs but some us authorities of more than submitting its going to fall at least according to the latest comments made by america's second treat all states join kerry said neither he nor the present you ever think that was happening because the system rattled or domestic politics simply because the technology and the ability of that. but the nsa chief keith l a film that question intends to plead ignorance of performing us ambassador said spying on foreign leaders did little to protect national security like some insisted it's actually policymakers including ambassadors who decide to these moments it so i'm a rift is crying in washington's political establishment of a who is responsible for the spying which caused a loss of trust among voters at home and i know he's been rewarded. and a breach of
elections in kosovo the first in which serbia urge minority serbs to bow. surfers education and cousin us political life is a key element of the european union brokered deal to end the dispute there and unlocks eu funds. but today is noting was marred by reports of masked men storming the main polling center in each of the except throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes the worldly local elections but for kosovo's leaders they were approved moniker of relations between ethnic albanians and serbs. is it a lot of videos. these are the first free elections for all of kosovo. and that makes them historic our young nation sees his successor though. it was the first boat in the north since kosovo broke away from serbia yet these selections in a test of the political maturity a test of democracy in our country and the best proof that everyone has a voice in the news came in just two years. attention has been focused on the serb minority in kosovo scam snore. one polling station closed after masked men stormed a smashing ballot boxes. ethnic serb hardliners called for a point on. and there wer
. >> you know why i'm here, really, i'm an educator now. what way? >> i'm trying to educate people to this problem of a fib. >> it's an irregular heartbeat. >> this affects like almost 6 million people. >> so you know? >> i know. >> she's an educator. >> and if you have it, you're five times more likely to have a stroke. so go easy on yourself. >> i thought your heart was just beating 'cause you were here. >> i'm excited, but i'm very close to having a stroke. but if you want to know more about it, i want to send people to fibs or fact.com. take a quiz. like deal or no deal. for everybody that takes the quiz, not only do you learn something, but you end up -- >> i got a little problem. >> what? >> you're worried about giving people a sudden shock and there is 6 million people with afib, yet you want to stun people with your pranks show. and if someone has afib and on your prank show, without knowing it, you could kill them. >> or you could save their life. >> no. the point is, this is so common and if you know about it, you -- >> i didn't know. >> how did you find out? >> i was goi
? they are smarter now? >> i think they have learned. they are certainly more educated. i don't know if they are more intelligent. >> we had 13 percent inflation with the fed in the 70s. >> true the inflation of the 70s is not necessarily caused by the fed. it is true that until paul volcker comes in and says look we are going to squeeze this into the place mow matter how much it hurt. we have a rising inflation expectation environment. that was tough and dark history. the dark spot on the history of the fed. i am not meaning isat tha to is anyway that they always do what is right. i am just saying it is important to have the fed there it is not really an alternative. if the fed weren't there would we not have had inflation in the 1970s? i don't know. >> as an alternative why don't we start with free currency. the stossel bill can print and the people who choose. >> we went through a period like that in the united states. there was no fed. every bank would print its own money. as you might image if you can print your own money a lot of people go out and print money. if you don't have an over site aut
? they're smarter now? >> i think they have learned. they are certainly more educated. i don't know if they are more intelligent. we had the fed in the '770s. we had 13% inflation. >> yeah, true. the inflation of the '70s is not necessarily caused by the fed. but it is true that until paul volcker comes in and says, look, we will skis in inflation out of the system no matter how bad it hurts, we definitely had a rising inflation expectations environment. that was pretty tough and dark history, dark spot on the history of the fed. so i'm not meaning to say, in any way, that central bankers are only doing what is right. i'm just saying, it is important to have the fed there and there's not really an alternative. you know. if you say, well, if the fed weren't there, would we have not had inflation in the 1970s? i don't know. >> what about the free banking. the stossel bank can print a bill and let's choose. >> that's the way it used to be, there was no fed. every bank would print its own money. the thing is, as you might imagine, if you can print your own money, a lot of people would p
people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. >>> and we're back with tonight's "outer circle" where we go to iran tonight. i asked why the coach decided to go to iran. >> reporter: erin, an american citizen making headlines for his decision to move here to iran and help iran's national soccer team qualify for the world cup. he was born in connecticut and been to the world cup with the portuguese team. he was coaching hartford when a colleague called him up and said how would you like to move to iran and help me coach this team? at the time iran was lock in a bitter feud with washington and many u.s. politicians called iran a rogue and dangerous nation secretly building a nuclear bomb. some still do. his friends and family said no to go. he ignored the warpgings and came here. initially he said he was a little wary. now that he knows iran a little bit, he said wha
education. for annie it meant moves from a tiny village to one of the world's biggest cities. >> translator: i'm not leaving mexico until i fine out what happened to my son. >> reporter: alone in a foreign land she carries on in the hope she'll have an answer soon. >>> for the first time the u.s. secretary of state has publicly admitted the national security agency may have overstepped the mark. >> in some cases i acknowledge to you, as does the president some of these actions have reached too far, and we're going to make sure that that is not going to happen in the future. >> simon we heard a very contrite john kerry, but are these just words or will they be followed up by action? >> well, it's not clear, because although it was very interesting in dimension and john kerry becomes the most senior administration official to admit that perhaps they went too far, and the surveillance was perhaps inappropriate. i don't think it went as far to a lay out any kind of apology. as we heard the majority of this answer was this intervention that he gave, in a sense was a justification for this huge s
, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. so i should probably get the last roll... yeah but i practiced my bassoon. [ mom ] and i listened. [ brother ] i can do this. [ imitates robot ] everyone deserves ooey, gooey, pillsbury cinnamon rolls. make the weekend pop. before william hughes fought in vietnam... and john hughes jumped into normandy... and john anderson hughes served in world war i... and before robert hughes joined the spanish-american war... there were families connected to the belief that freedom was worth fighting for. we're proud to help veterans and their families succeed here at home. >>> virginia politics, former president bill clinton is on the campaign trail in my home state, stumpi stumping terry mccalliffe, it is he part of a 3-day tour ahead of the november 5th election. ken cuccinelli is getting a little help on the trail right
of the things that you would need to make an educated decision on whether it's right or not. but the idea lone that they have 35,000 employees. >> and google -- you know, schmidt has to succk up to the left because it's google that i think of. the great thing about this is you don't have to be mad at the president for this because it's bush anyway. he started it. the president was unable to stop it. >> this has nothing to do -- this is -- >> i would be somewhat -- if i wanted to slam the current administration, i could, but i don't want to. i don't have a problem with this. and the people that do have a problem with it, they don't really like president obama because they're basically an extension of bush's -- >> at this point you have some on the intelligence committee saying look, some of the stuff they told us they were doing, it's not true. some of the things they were not doing, they didn't tell us about. there's a select group of people who need to know. >> there's no business implication. i'm curious what you think of this. google is a u.hs.-based company. at&t may struggle to be able to
education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. the end. lovely read susan. but isn't it time to turn the page on your cup of joe? gevalia, or a cup of johan, is like losing yourself in a great book. may i read something? yes, please. of course. a rich, never bitter taste cup after cup. net weight 340 grams. [ sighs ] [ chuckles ] [ announcer ] always rich, never bitter. gevalia. >>> a manhunt is under way for four escaped inmates that police are calling pretty crafty. the four made a daring escape from a local jail in caddo county early sunday morning. kerry sanders is standing by with the very latest on this. explain the crafty way these four escaped. >> reporter: well, very crafty because they found a hole in a system. but they found a way in a new system because the jail here is only really about a year old. $11 million spent for the new jail and the court complex here. the sheriff is here right now. sheriff gene cain, i'm sort of c
. of providing a free world-class education for anyone, anywhere. if you look at a khan academy video, they cover everything from basic arithmetic to calculus, trigonometry, finance. you can really just get what you need at your own pace. and so, bank of america came and reached out to us and said, "we are really interested in making sure that everyone really understands personal finance." we're like, "well, we're already doing that." and so it was kind of a perfect match. we don't have time for stuff like laundry. we're too busy having fun. we get everything perfectly clean by tossing one of these in the wash. and that's it. i wanted to do that. oh, come on. eh, that's my favorite part. really? that's our tide. what'sours? ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] with five perfectly sweetened whole grains... you can't help but see the good. >>> 20 minutes past the hour and time for the daily slide show. a deadly storm with hurricane force winds slamming several european nations. at least 13 people reported dead. officials say the storm knocked out power to hundreds of thousands of homes and this is the wors
on the table in education funding. and what happens? well, to those i say this. and to you i say this who i deeply respect. here and off the floor of the committee and off the floor of the house, what are you going to do about the approximately 17 million children with pre-existing conditions who can no longer be denied health insurance coverage? you want to go back? you want to say you are no longer covered any longer? you going to tell the parents of those kids? which one of you is going to stand up and tell the parents of those children the game is over, sorry, that was just a phase. >> will the gentleman yield? >> yes, i will. >> i would just tell you that -- >> where are you? >> right here. you asked a question. i'm going to answer it. it's a false choice to say it's obama care or nothing. there are numerous proposals including the one that i'm a cosponsor of. >> i yield back. i take back the time, sir. >> the president's signature health care law, welcome to, everyone, this is "around the world" and a special welcome to our international viewers joining us all of this week. i'm michae
under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. more adventures await in the lexus lx, rx, and new seven-passenger gx. dare to be spontaneous. >>> welcome back. who's the most powerful person in the world? according to forbes magazine it is vladimir putin. forbes is out with the list of the 72 most powerful people on the planet. the russian president comes in number one. president obama is at number two this year followed by the leader of china, pope francis, germany's chancellor as well. the rest of the top ten, bill gates, ben bernanke, saudi arabia's king be a duab abdul, of the central bank. >> were you surprised that vladimir putin is number one? >> sells magazines. >> any magazine that does a list i'm always skeptical of. >> it every magazine does a list. >> this what is they call on the internet trawling. that is what they do. trawling. it's preposterous
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